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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2018-25
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 26 Mar 2018

Research article | 26 Mar 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Assessing the large-scale impacts of environmental change using a coupled hydrology and soil erosion model

Joris P. C. Eekhout1, Wilco Terink2, and Joris de Vente1,3 Joris P. C. Eekhout et al.
  • 1Soil Erosion and Conservation Research Group, CEBAS-CSIC, Spanish Research Council, Campus Universitario Espinardo, 30100, P.O. Box 164, Murcia, Spain
  • 2IQ-Hydrology, Ben van Londenstraat 48, 6709 TM Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • 3FutureWater, Costerweg 1V, 6702 AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Abstract. Assessing the impacts of environmental change on soil erosion and sediment yield at the large catchment scale remains one of the main challenges in soil erosion modelling studies. Here, we present a process-based soil erosion model, based on the integration of the Morgan-Morgan-Finney erosion model in a daily-based hydrological model. The model overcomes many of the limitations of previous large-scale soil erosion models, as it includes a more complete representation of crucial processes like surface runoff generation, dynamic vegetation development, and sediment deposition, and runs at the catchment scale with a daily time step. This makes the model especially suited for evaluation of the impacts of environmental change on soil erosion and sediment yield at large spatial scales. The model was successfully applied in a large catchment in southeastern Spain. We demonstrate the models capacity to perform impact assessments of environmental change scenarios, specifically simulating the scenario impacts of intra- and inter-annual variations in climate, land management and vegetation development on soil erosion and sediment yield.

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Joris P. C. Eekhout et al.
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Short summary
Climate change will likely increase soil erosion in many locations worldwide. The increase of soil erosion will have a large-scale impact, such as the siltation of reservoirs. We developed a new soil erosion model to evaluate these impacts, which has the advantage over existing models that it includes most relevant processes: rainfall-runoff generation, vegetation development, and soil erosion and deposition. The model is suited to perform scenario studies on climate change and land management.
Climate change will likely increase soil erosion in many locations worldwide. The increase of...
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