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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2018-62
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Short communication 13 Aug 2018

Short communication | 13 Aug 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf).

Short Communication: Monitoring rock falls with the Raspberry Shakes

Andrea Manconi1, Velio Coviello2, Maud Galletti1, and Reto Seifert1 Andrea Manconi et al.
  • 1Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Dept. of Earth Sciences, Zurich, 8092, Switzerland
  • 2Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Facoltà di Scienze e Tecnologie, Italy

Abstract. We evaluate the performance of the low-cost seismic sensors Raspberry Shake (RS) to identify and monitor rock fall activity in alpine environments. The test area is a slope adjacent to the Great Aletsch glacier in the Swiss Alps, i.e. the Moosfluh deep-seated instability, which is undergoing an acceleration phase since the late summer 2016. A local seismic network composed of three RS seismometers was deployed starting from May 2017, in order to record rock fall activity and its relation with the progressive rock slope degradation potentially leading to a large rock slope failure. Here we present a first assessment of the seismic data acquired from RS sensors after a monitoring period of 1-year. A webcam was installed on the opposite side of the active slope, acquiring images every 10 minutes to validate the occurrence and identify rock falls as well as their location and approximate size. Despite seismic data were collected mainly to identify rock fall phenomena, other event types were recorded during the monitoring period. Thus, this work provides also general insights on the potential use of low cost sensors in environmental seismology investigations.

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We evaluated the performance of the low-cost seismic sensors Raspberry Shake (RS) to identify and monitor rock fall activity in alpine environments. The sensors have been tested for 1-year period in high alpine environment, recording numerous rock failure events as well as local and distant earthquakes. This study demonstrates that the RS instruments provide a good option to build low seismic monitoring networks to monitor different kind of geophysical phenomena.
We evaluated the performance of the low-cost seismic sensors Raspberry Shake (RS) to identify...
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