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Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2019-10
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2019-10
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 23 Apr 2019

Research article | 23 Apr 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf).

Quantifying Restoration Success of Wood Introductions to Increase Coho Salmon Winter Habitat

Russell T. Bair1, Catalina Segura1, and Christopher M. Lorion2 Russell T. Bair et al.
  • 1Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management, Oregon State University, 201 Peavy Hall Corvallis Oregon 97331 USA
  • 2Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, 4034 Fairview Industrial Drive SE, Salem, OR 97302 USA

Abstract. Large wood (LW) addition is often part of fish habitat restoration projects. However, there is limited information about the spatial-temporal variability in hydraulic changes after LW additions. We investigated reach scale hydraulic changes relevant to juvenile Coho Salmon survival triggered immediately after the addition of LW. We used Nays2DH, an unsteady two-dimensional flow model to quantify patterns and magnitudes of changes of stream velocity (v) and shear stress (τ) in three alluvial gravel reaches. The study sites are located in low gradient reaches draining 5 to 16 km2 in the Oregon Coast Range. Survivable habitat was characterized in terms of critical swim speed for juvenile Coho and bed stability considering the critical τ required to mobilize the median bed particle size. Model predictions indicated that survivable habitat during bankfull conditions, measured as the area with v below the critical swim speed for juvenile Coho, increased by 95–113 % after the LW restoration. Bed stability also increases between 86–128 % considering the τ required to mobilize the median bed particle size. Model predictions indicated more habitat created in the larger site, however considering that wood would move more frequently in this site there appears to be a trade-off between the timing and the resilience of restoration benefits. Overall, this study quantifies how the addition of LW potentially changes stream hydraulics to provide a net benefit to juvenile salmonid habitat. Our findings are applicable to stream restoration efforts throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Russell T. Bair et al.
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Short summary
The addition of large wood (LW) pieces is often part of fish habitat restoration projects. We investigated reach scale changes after the addition of LW that are relevant to juvenile Coho Salmon. Survivable habitat was characterized in terms of critical swim speed for juvenile Coho and bed stability. Model predictions shoed that survivable habitat increased by 86–128 % in terms of v and bed stability. Our findings are applicable to stream restoration efforts throughout the Pacific Northwest.
The addition of large wood (LW) pieces is often part of fish habitat restoration projects. We...
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