Journal cover Journal topic
Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.765 IF 3.765
  • IF 5-year value: 3.719 IF 5-year
    3.719
  • CiteScore value: 3.83 CiteScore
    3.83
  • SNIP value: 1.281 SNIP 1.281
  • IPP value: 3.61 IPP 3.61
  • SJR value: 1.527 SJR 1.527
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 17 Scimago H
    index 17
  • h5-index value: 18 h5-index 18
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2019-73
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-2019-73
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 11 Dec 2019

Submitted as: research article | 11 Dec 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf).

Interactions between channels and tributary alluvial fans: channel adjustments and sediment-signal propagation

Sara Savi1, Stefanie Tofelde2,3, Andrew D. Wickert4, Aaron Bufe3, Taylor F. Schildgen1,3, and Manfred R. Strecker1 Sara Savi et al.
  • 1Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
  • 2Institut für Umweltwissenschaften und Geographie, Universität Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
  • 3Helmholtz Zentrum Potsdam, GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
  • 4Departmentof Earth Sciences and Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Abstract. Climate and tectonics impact water and sediment fluxes to fluvial systems. These boundary conditions set river form and can be recorded by fluvial deposits. Reconstructions of boundary conditions from these deposits, however, is complicated by complex channel-network interactions and associated sediment storage and release through the fluvial system. To address this challenge, we used a physical experiment to study the interplay between a main channel and a tributary under different forcing conditions. In particular, we investigated the impact of a single tributary junction, where sediment supply from the tributary can produce an alluvial fan, on channel geometries and associated sediment-transfer dynamics. We found that the presence of an alluvial fan may promote or prevent sediment to be moved within the fluvial system, creating different coupling conditions. A prograding alluvial fan, for example, has the potential to disrupt the sedimentary signal propagating downstream through the confluence zone. By analyzing different environmental scenarios, our results indicate the contribution of the two sub-systems to fluvial deposits, both upstream and downstream of the tributary junction, which may be diagnostic of a perturbation affecting the tributary or the main channel only. We summarize all findings in a new conceptual framework that illustrates the possible interactions between tributary alluvial fans and a main channel under different environmental conditions. This framework provides a better understanding of the composition and architecture of fluvial sedimentary deposits found at confluence zones, which is essential for a correct reconstruction of the climatic or tectonic history of a basin.

Sara Savi et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Sara Savi et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 347 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
273 70 4 347 12 7 1
  • HTML: 273
  • PDF: 70
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 347
  • Supplement: 12
  • BibTeX: 7
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Dec 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Dec 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 255 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 248 with geography defined and 7 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 25 Jan 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Fluvial deposits record changes in water and sediment supply. As such, they are often used to reconstruct the tectonic or climatic history of a basin. In this study we used an experimental setting to analyze how fluvial deposits register changes in water or sediment supply at a confluence zone. We provide a new conceptual framework that may help understanding the construction of these deposits under different forcings conditions, a crucial information to correctly infer the history of a basin.
Fluvial deposits record changes in water and sediment supply. As such, they are often used to...
Citation